Tag Archive: Side Effects

  1. Effects of Cocaine on the Body

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    drug side effects

    Cocaine is a powerful, expensive drug that delivers a short, intense euphoria. Everybody knows that. But how exactly does it work? What occurs inside the body and brain when somebody snorts cocaine, and what are the side effects, apart from the obvious ones?

    Once it enters the bloodstream, cocaine makes its way to the brain’s reward center and triggers a massive dopamine rush. As a result, users experience a sense of joy, alertness, and energy. The side-effects, on the other hand, are hardly detectable to the user him or herself; that’s part of what makes cocaine so dangerous. When you couple a fabulous feeling (euphoria) with a dangerous physiological phenomena (raised heart rate and blood pressure), you’re bound to wind up in the emergency room soon or a later.

    Methods, Time and Duration

    There are three common ways of administering cocaine: inhaling, which is done with a pipe; snorting, which is done with a rolled up dollar bill or note card; and injecting, which is achieved by dissolving the cocaine in water and administering it intravenously using needles.

    Cocaine addiction happens before the addict knows what hit them. Very quickly, after just weeks of regular use, they become bogged down by anxiety, panic, paranoia, restlessness. The behavior isn’t specific to drug abusers, but it’s a sign to watch out for nonetheless.

    Withdrawal and Treatments for Cocaine Abuse

    After using cocaine for several days or longer, it’s not easy to stop. In a desperate bid to retain a state of physiological balance, the human brain will slow its functions. It’s not just cravings this causes; it’s all-around lethargy. If the dopamine receptors are damaged badly enough, nothing except cocaine can excite you anymore, that’s when depression hits.

    Several medications originally intended for other conditions happen to help ease cocaine withdrawal. In terms of cocaine-specific drugs, we’re getting closer and closer everyday. Several such drugs are being tested as you read this. The more we learn about the brain, the closer we come.

    In addition to medicinal aid, we must also hone in on the psychological aspect of cocaine addiction. Even if someone doesn’t have to use cocaine, they still might wish to use cocaine. That’s why people relapse: they can’t help but water that seed. Treatments like Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) help us see our situations clearly and realize we don’t even want to use.

     

    To help get you or a loved one off cocaine for good, call Sustain: 949-637-5499

  2. Is Ibogaine hallucination a way out of Heroin Addiction?

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    Is Ibogaine hallucination a way out of Heroin Addiction?

     

    Ibogaine is an experimental alternative treatment for various forms of substance addiction. It provides therapeutic relief from many substance withdrawals and even some behavioral addictions like obsessive compulsive disorder, self-harm, and problem gambling.

    Opiate addicts seem to benefit the most, though, with about 80 percent of cases reporting improvements.

    What Is It?

     

    Ibogaine actually the active chemical in the African Tabernanthe Iboga, a root used traditionally in the West African Bwiti religion for various ceremonies and rituals. Although illegal in the US for its strong psychedelic qualities, ibogaine is used medicinally for for reducing the symptoms of heroin and opioid withdrawals. It appears to interrupt mechanisms in the brain that are conditioned to influence and maintain opioid addiction. Large doses of ibogaine can temporarily eliminate substance-related cravings. It’s not the only drug to do this, but it’s one of the safest, least abuse-prone out there.

    How Does It Work?

     

    Ibogaine works by acting on the brain’s receptor systems and resetting dopamine uptake pathways; this allows the brain “rewire” itself, thus eliminating conditioned responses to opioid drugs. ibogaine helps eliminate habitual thought patterns, and that’s the key to reestablishing normal neurochemistry. It works on a purely physiological level.

    Ibogaine for Addiction Treatment

     

    There are very few ibogaine treatment centers in the world right now: just a few in Mexico, Australia, and Europe. Before undergoing ibogaine treatment, patients should be screened, assessed, and approved by a psychiatrist. Individuals with heart conditions, high blood pressure, or organ conditions should inform their doctor before taking ibogaine, and anyone with a history of psychological illness, especially addiction, should avoid this substance. Ibogaine shouldn’t be mixed with any other drugs unless a doctor approves it.

    Side Effects?

     

    ibogaine may cause nausea, vomiting, numbness, and, most notably, auditory and visual hallucinations that can last up to 20 hours on a single dose. During these hallucinations, patients are sometimes immobilized. Ibogaine can also cause anxieties and/or intense emotional distortions, in which case you should stop taking the drug immediately and contact a professional healthcare provider.

    If you live in the US, ibogaine treatment isn’t an option for you. However, there are numerous similar medicinal and behavioral treatments for drug withdrawals. Call Sustain to discuss our approach to drug withdrawal and the use of medical agonists as relapse-preventers: (949) 637-5499

I first met Sayeh in November of 2013 just after my 15 year old daughter had been admitted to a residential treatment program. As part of the program I was required to attend 2-3 AlAnon meetings a week. Sayeh attended the same AlAnon meetings as well as Alumni events as I. It soon became apparent to me that Sayeh had a heart for recovery, program, and God. When I was encouraged to get a sponsor I didn’t hesitate. Dependable, respectful, kind and generous of spirit, she exudes an inner peace that I hope to achieve with her loving guidance, as I work my own program. She is patient, & full of wisdom that she is always happy to share with her sponsees and fellow parents. I am so grateful our journeys brought us together.

Megan
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